Unintentional injuries in childhood
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Unintentional injuries in childhood results from Canadian health surveys by Ivan B. Pless

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Published by Health Canada in [Ottawa] .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Canada.,
  • Canada

Subjects:

  • Children"s accidents -- Canada.,
  • Children -- Wounds and injuries -- Canada.,
  • Youth -- Wounds and injuries -- Canada.,
  • Children"s accidents -- Canada -- Prevention.,
  • Children"s accidents -- Canada -- Longitudinal studies.,
  • Enfants -- Accidents -- Canada.,
  • Enfants -- Lésions et blessures -- Canada.,
  • Jeunesse -- Lésions et blessures -- Canada.,
  • Enfants -- Accidents -- Canada -- Prévention.,
  • Enfants -- Accidents -- Canada -- Études longitudinales.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesBlessures non intentionnelles chez les enfants
StatementBarry Pless and Wayne Millar.
GenreLongitudinal studies., Études longitudinales.
ContributionsMillar, W. J., Canada. Health Canada.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHV675.72 .P54 2000
The Physical Object
Pagination99 p. ;
Number of Pages99
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3629803M
ISBN 100662286073
LC Control Number2002421365
OCLC/WorldCa47118643

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  The CDC Childhood Injury Report: Patterns of Unintentional Injuries among 0–19 Year Olds in the United States, – uses data from the National Vital Statistics Systems and the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System–All Injury Program to provide an overview of unintentional injuries related to drowning, falls, fires or. Incidence of Unintentional Childhood Injury in U.S. Estimated non-fatal injuries per year: >20 million; Required medical attention (): 8 Million; Hospitalizations (): ,; Fatal unintentional injuries per year: >11, Most common cause of childhood deaths in U.S. (40%). This chapter examines the issue of unintentional injuries and focuses on a selected number of cause-specific unintentional injuries. Injuries have traditionally been defined as damage to a person caused by an acute transfer of energy (mechanical, thermal, electrical, chemical, or radiation) or by the sudden absence of heat or oxygen. Unintentional injuries consist of that .   The CDC Childhood Injury Report: Patterns of Unintentional Injuries among 0–19 Year Olds in the United States, – uses data from the National Vital Statistics Systems and the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System–All Injury Program to provide an overview of unintentional injuries related to drowning, falls, fires or burns, poisoning, suffocation, and .

Fatal unintentional injuries per year: >11, Most common cause of childhood deaths in U.S. (40%) Causes: Serious unintentional injury. Non-fatal injuries requiring hospitalization. Falls (33% of injuries) Infant Walkers, stairs, out of windows; Contact Injury (23% of injuries) Laceration or skin punctures (6% of injuries). Falls are the leading cause of unintentional fatal and non-fatal injuries in older adults from the ages of 65 and older. This major health concern results in more than million injuries treated in emergency departments, over , hospitalizations and more t deaths a year in the U.S alone (National Council On Aging, ). Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death among children in the United States over the age of six months. They also cause more childhood .   Kendrick D, Barlow J, Hampshire A, Polnay L, Stewart-Brown S. Parenting interventions for the prevention of unintentional injuries in childhood. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. (4):CDCited by:

  Household environment has particular importance in unintentional injuries. The home is the leading location of injury for young children, accounting for nearly half of all childhood injuries. 5,6 Preschoolers, who spend most of their time at home, are more prone to be exposed to home injuries compared with school age children. 7,8Cited by: 5. Unintentional injuries (also referred to as non-intentional or inadvertent injuries) are the leading cause of death for children in both the United States (Rodriguez, ) and Canada (Canadian. Unintentional Injury. Unintentional injuries are the fifth leading cause of death for persons aged 65 to 84,5 and falls are the leading cause of accidental death in older adults, accounting for deaths in the United States in Of all fall-related fractures, hip fractures cause the greatest number of deaths and lead to the most severe health problems and reduced quality of life.7,8. Unintentional Injury Prevention Injuries are not accidents—they are predictable and preventable. Unintentional injuries—including traffic-related injuries, falls, burns, poisonings, and drownings—are responsible for lost lives, decreased quality of .